Tag Archives: rock climbing

La Hermida climbing guide review by Mike Owen

It’s out! The guidebook to Spain’s best-kept secret and one of the best summer climbing venues in Europe. Had enough of going to the usual places and you fancy a change? Fed up of the crowds, the heat and the polished routes? Look no further, the crags in this book have got everything you’re looking for.

El Desfiladero de la Hermida covers the climbing centred around the village of La Hermida, which is located in the gorge called El Desfiladero de la Hermida that runs north/south through the eastern end of the picturesque Picos de Europa, from Panes to Potes, on the border between Cantabria and Asturias.

El valle de La Hermida - The La hermida valley...

El valle de La Hermida – The La hermida valley…

This is a really beautiful part of Spain; known as “green Spain” due to the abundance of vegetation as a result of the maritime climate, the scenery is simply stunning. The topography is classic karst limestone. The gorge has very steep sides that are riddled with rocky gullies that lead up to high craggy peaks with breath taking views. There are crags everywhere and the potential for more development is obvious. It gets even better; the summer temperatures are typically in the mid-twenties, which make such a pleasant change compared to many parts in Europe. In fact a normal season here extends from late spring (as the tufas dry out) until early winter, when the first of the rain which keeps the valleys so green arrives. Though the addition of many quick-drying, walls and slabs outside the main valley means that there should be something to get on all year round.

The upper crag has so many great wall climbs, this time it's Orujo de Liébana, 7c

The upper crag has so many great wall climbs, this time it’s Orujo de Liébana, 7c

There is plenty to do on rest days; just a 30 minute drive away is the coast with the possibility of surfing the Atlantic swell. Alternatively, there are numerous paths that can take you up into the heart of the Picos de Europa or you can take the cable car up to the most famous mountain in the area, the Naranjo de Bulnes. If all of the above activities sound too strenuous, you may just prefer to go and relax at the climbers bar in La Hermida (La Cuadrono) and sample Chucho and Angela’s wonderful hospitality. However, if you’re staying in Potes, try the climbers bar (La Reunion) and sample some of their home made beers or enjoy a nice cheap coffee (don’t forget this is Spain, so prices are always very reasonable).

Tanya Meredith on the final slap of Karim Abdul Jabbar, 7b+,

Tanya Meredith on the final slap of Karim Abdul Jabbar, 7b+,

For years there have been rumours of great climbing in this part of Northern Spain but information was always scarce. Then three years ago Richie Patterson published the excellent Roca Verde, a selective topo covering some of the crags in Cantabria, Asturias and Leon. As a result the area started to receive more attention, justifiably so. Due to this new found popularity Richie, in collaboration with the local Cantabrian climbers, has put this definitive guidebook together, specifically covering all of the new (or previously hidden) crags in the La Hermida valley, and what a guidebook it is.

The first thing you will notice when you flick through La Desfiladero de la Hermida is the attention to detail that has been put into the presentation and that it is written in Spanish and English. The introduction is concise, yet has all the necessary information you need, including a very clear general map, where to stay and what the topo symbols mean. There is an interesting section on ‘Geography and Wildlife’ as well as a very important section on ‘Access and Etiquette’.

Mike Owen in action at Rumenes...

Mike Owen in action at Rumenes…

Each crag has its own introduction, including the style of climbing, orientation regarding the sun, walk in times and access map with GPS coordinates. The topos are very accurately drawn on clear colour photos and printed on top quality paper. All pitch lengths are given. However there are no stars. The authors don’t want climbers to be drawn towards particular routes, with the result that they become polished and end up with queues during busy periods, they want you to find out for yourself and have fun doing so. The action photos are some of the best I have seen in a climbing guide and really do give you that all important first impression; in other words they fire you up, your fingers start to sweat and you start mentally planning how to get there as soon as possible.

The valley is already quite well known for its amazing tufas at steep crags such as Rumenes and El Infierno. However, this is not just an area that suits climbers operating in the big numbers because what is not so well known, is the fact that there are also many crags that offer really enjoyable climbing at a more reasonable standard in equally impressive surroundings. In fact much of the new guide is taken up with crags with amenable grades that should allow mixed parties to enjoy the valley more; making a morning cranking on tufas followed by an afternoon on the slabs (or vice versa) a practical option!

The guide includes a total of 32 crags, of which 24 are published for the first time, including the jaw-dropping Cueva Carcalosa (which will soon become internationally important for those seeking long steep voyages in tufa paradise) and the long established, but nonetheless previously secret, Cicera (with its wealth of demanding crimpy climbing in the summer shade).  La Desfiladero de la Hermida is in A5 format, has 176 pages and almost 700 routes to choose from III+ to 8c+ and offers great value at £20. Please bear in mind that it is the only definitive guide and purchasing it will help contribute towards future equipping in the area. After you’ve been climbing, don’t forget to have a beer at La Cuadrona, followed by a swim in the hot springs up the road.

My advice: skip Ceuse this summer, buy this topo, book your ferry. Job done!

El Desfiladero de La Hermida is published by Roca Verde and available direct from www.rocaverdeclimbing.com

Gema Lanza,  7a, El Salmón

Gema Lanza, 7a, El Salmón

La Hermida guide in stores across northern Spain…

After a hectic week of deliveries – then re-deliveries after the books sold out – our new guidebook is available in a ton of shops and bars across the region. And as the first batch sold out so quickly so we’ve done a second visit and loaded the stores with copies.

A quick list of the stores with books in the La Hermida region is:
Santander – Eiger Sport
Torrelavega – K2 Aventura
La Hermida – La Cuadrona /  Andaras
Potes – Tienda Indiana / Bar La Reunion / Libreria Vela / Bustamante de Potes
Arenas de Cabrales – La Tienda Nueva / Cendon
Cangas de Onis – Tuñon – Libreria Imagen

Then further west – around Oviedo and the Valles de Trubia:
Gijón – Indoor Wall
Aviles – Gravity Climbing
Oviedo – D-Ruta / Oxigeno
Valles de Trubia – Bar Sobia, Entrago / Bar Aladino, San Martin / Club de Montana Aguja de Sobia, Entrago.

Or you can buy the book direct from our pages…

http://bit.ly/BuyLaHermida

La guiá contiene un montón de fotos nuevas muy chulas de la escalada del valle...The guidebook cover features two of the most prominent climbers of the area...

La guiá contiene un montón de fotos nuevas muy chulas de la escalada del valle…The guidebook cover features two of the most prominent climbers of the area…

 

 

Vistas impresionantes, con Carcalosa detras... Alex López,
Ritmo caribeño,
F: José Alberto Puente Great view of the angle of the crag: and you can see Carcalosa behind

Cicera – Crags of La Hermida #1

A world-class venue, and possibly the crag that everyone´s been waiting for more than any other, Cicera has a selection of brilliant climbs on perfect rock. Sitting opposite, and complementing almost perfectly the ludicrous tufas of Carcalosa, the main sector is only slightly overhanging making for technical and very pumpy wall climbing.

Carlos Cué, Plataforma, 7c, Cicera, una vía muy técnica de placa desplomada.

Carlos Cué, Plataforma, 7c, Cicera, una vía muy técnica de placa desplomada.

It’s a mix of grey and orange rock with good friction and mainly long or very long routes. For those climbing in the high 7s and 8s there’s an endless supply of testpieces and, unlike much of the valley, it’s a venue where finger strength and climbing ability take precedence over big arms!

Vistas impresionantes, con Carcalosa detras... Alex López, Ritmo caribeño, F: José Alberto Puente Great view of the angle of the crag: and you can see Carcalosa behind

Vistas impresionantes, con Carcalosa detras… Alex López,
Ritmo caribeño, F: José Alberto Puente Great view of the angle of the crag: and you can see Carcalosa behind

In addition, the lower crag provides more entertainment in it’s own style with grey almost ‘Verdon-like’ fingery slabs and some tough, shorter roofs.

Carlos Cué, Mar Negro, 7b+, Sector Abajo, Cicera. Placa técnica de fuerza de dedos...One of the brilliant wall climbs on the lower crag...

Carlos Cué, Mar Negro, 7b+, Sector Abajo, Cicera. Placa técnica de fuerza de dedos…One of the brilliant wall climbs on the lower crag…

The familiar theme is the lack of easier climbs but with such high-quality routes it’s easy to forgive.

Routes Summary
V+ – 6c+ = 4
7a – 7c+ = 28
8a – 8c+ = 23

Another view of the lower crag, this time a super cool 7a, Corbatas de Unquera.

Another view of the lower crag, this time a super cool 7a, Corbatas de Unquera.

Children: Fine for older children but quite a long walk in and steep underneath.

Season: Usefully, the upper crag is almost never in the sun so it’s great through the summer and can also get a good breeze in late afternoon. The lack of sun does mean it can be cold in late autumn and spring and once wet it does seep a bit and can take a while to dry – though there are plenty of routes which stay dry all year. Overall it’s a very reliable venue for good conditions.

The upper crag has so many great wall climbs, this time it's Orujo de Liébana, 7c

The upper crag has so many great wall climbs, this time it’s Orujo de Liébana, 7c

 

Desde el inerior de la cueva...Alberto Hontavilla explorando el muro. The view from the inside. F. Reini Wallmann

Carcalosa – Resumenes de las escuelas de La Hermida #2

Un lugar de primera categoría, con un sorprendente surtido de líneas increíbles en una enorme cueva y sus muros colindantes.

Crossing the river...Como llegar, el rio!!

Crossing the river…Como llegar, el rio!!

La pared de la derecha es más asequible, con algunos sextos, mientras que la de la izquierda es impresionante por su desplome y la selección de vías muy duras; en ambos casos, la mayoría discurren sobre chorreras y son bastante largas. El acceso es muy empinado, pero vale la pena para quienes quieran disfrutar escalando vías excepcionales a partir del séptimo grado.

Caroline Ciavaldini en los ultimos pasos de Geyperman, 7c+. The last part of the 35m Geyperman on the right wall...

Caroline Ciavaldini en los ultimos pasos de Geyperman, 7c+. The last part of the 35m Geyperman on the right wall…

La roca en el interior de la cueva es blanca, con poca adherencia, pero la pared de la derecha es calcáreo gris y naranja, muy adherente. Puede decirse que ofrece la más impresionante concentración de chorreras del valle, con muchas posibilidades de apertura todavía.

Desde el inerior de la cueva...Alberto Hontavilla explorando el muro. The view from the inside. F. Reini Wallmann

Desde el inerior de la cueva…Alberto Hontavilla explorando el muro. The view from the inside. F. Reini Wallmann

En invierno el río puede ir demasiado crecido para cruzarlo, lo cual impide el acceso. Bien equipado con parabolts y reuniones.

Resumen de las vias:
V+ – 6c+ = 4
7a – 7c+ = 18
8a – 8c+ = 18

Niños: El acceso no es muy adecuado para niños, con muchas cuerdas fijas sobre roca muy empinada.

La vista desde Cicera...The view of the cave from Cicera...

La vista desde Cicera…The view of the cave from Cicera…

Época: Por su orientación sureste se puede escalar todo el año, con sombra a partir de las 14:00 en la pared de la derecha y mucho antes en la cueva. El problema es que las chorreras filtran en invierno y primavera.

Es mejor desde finales de primavera a principios de invierno. En verano puede correr un poco de aire por la tarde. En invierno y en primavera, si llueve mucho, el río a menudo va demasiado crecido para cruzarlo; ante la duda, mejor no intentarlo.

La portada del libro con Alberto Hontavilla en su proyecto de Urdón. F. José Alberto Puente

New La Hermida guide book!

Our new La Hermida climbing guide is at the printers!!!

The most anticipated guidebook of the year ‘El Desfiladero de La Hermida – the definitive sport climbing guide’ which contains 24 never before published crags (and nearly 700 routes) in this tufa-strewn region of northern Spain will be in shops in two weeks. 

However, you can be the first to get your hands on the book by pre-ordering it here on our website. And as soon as the book arrives in our warehouse we’ll ship it straight to you…the cost of the book is £20 and is available with free shipping to the UK for a limited period. 

Buy from the UK

Comprar desde España

Buy from Europe

La portada del libro con tiene Alberto Hontavilla en su proyecto de Urdón. F. José Alberto Puente

The front cover with Alberto Hontavilla on his project at Urdón. Ph. José Alberto Puente

 

To find out more about La Hermida and get a flavour of what’s on offer check out this destination guide on UKC

Old Dogs New Tricks – Day 141 – Re-test – Back on the horse…

Ok so in truth I’m 5 months in and probably nowhere near where I wanted to be. (see the challenge here)

And there are extenuating  circumstances: niggling injuries, bigger injuries, climbing trips, moving house (plus lots of visitors to said house), finishing my second book and possibly most of all an inability to not go climbing when surrounded by rock. But as i am finding out going climbing doesn’t necessarily make you a better climber – or at least it doesn’t bring you any closer to unrealistic goals!!

But as we all know ‘extenuating circumstances’ are just excuses wrapped in flowery prose. So as I sit in front of Tom’s house with the dread of a kid who hasn’t studied for an exam I know that I would mark myself ‘must do better’ even before I started.

Below the new Lattice board...

Below the new Lattice board…excuses have no currency here…

The test doesn’t budge, you can’t fool it, there’s no leeway, so I am hoping at least the training I have done – probably 25% of what Tom set me – helps. And I mutter the right things to him and Ollie before the test, and in truth I have found the whole thing great. The Lattice boys, Tom Randall and Ollie Torr, certainly did their side and provided me with a brilliant springboard. It’s not their fault if the client doesn’t dive deep enough.

I warm up, taking more time this time, knowing what’s coming. The test was brutal and I am trying to delay it a bit. However, the bonus now is that the new Lattice board is smoother, cleaner, more skin and finger friendly. I am getting psyched. I really want to climb on it.

First up is the hang test. Like the first time I can only do this on my right hand as my left is buggered so I strain and pull and managed 5 secs with 6.5kg then again with 4.5kg and fall a bit short with 3kg. I’m happy, last time I had one go in me.

Richie 1

Simple but effective. A 20mm edge a stopwatch and some weight!

Then to the main event, the Lattice board. Tom explains in more detail this time how he and Ollie derive the results – it’s clever but it washes over me as the adrenaline builds and I set off.

‘Stop’ I’m three moves in and Tom’s voice brings me to a halt.

‘Why are you using three fingers on your left Richie? You said you weren’t injured.’

I thought I’d got through, bullshitting that my baby finger (which is pretty bad) wasn’t too bad and in the intervening weeks since my FB post was basically OK.

‘I told you, you can’t do the test if you’re injured.’

‘But i need to know’ I protest ‘and I’m sure I can do it with three.’

Tom’s cross over from mate to ‘coach mode’ is quick and he brooks no nonsense. I plead to no avail but Ollie pipes up with an idea. They’ve got a work around. I do a 7:3 hang test. Possibly even more brutal but not going to stress my left hand and they can get some useful results from it.

Ollie counts me down as i hang, 7 seconds on my right, then rest 3 on my left. Repeat ad nauseum as they say. Even though it’s a destroyer and by the 6th ‘maximum’ I am screaming with pump I’m happy to be able to do something. Each block of ten hurts more but I grin and bear it and try to mentally ‘beat’ my previous time.

7 on 3 off....

7 on 3 off….

I collapse. With one super pumped arm and one unstressed baby finger. Job done.

Tom puzzles over how to get useful results....

Tom puzzles over how to get useful results….

Sitting round the table at Tom’s after crunching the numbers they show me my new graph. Set against the last one it makes for reasonable reading – more recovery, more stamina and in general a bit better. However, interestingly Tom’s take is most crucial – there is adaption, I am trainable!!!

He’s quite pleased. There’s something to work with and he goes into a huddle with Ollie.

‘OK Richie, the truth is we can’t condone climbing on an injury, so the only way to continue is to have time off and train weights rings and core. Ollie’s the man for this so meet him on Wed morning at ‘the Works’ and we’ll start again.’

Phew, the adventure continues…

 

 

Old Dogs New Tricks – Catch-Up Blog #1 Otinar – Training week 3 / Overall week 4 (Feb 22nd – 27th)

Ok so here’s the first of my ‘retro-blogs’ as a catch up to where I am at with ‘Old Dogs New Tricks’…

Otinar – Training week 3 / Overall week 4 (Feb 22nd – 27th)

Ok so we left our hero (me btw) on the horns of a dilemma – a late, light session on my board the day before I was going away had left me with a very sore strained arm (or worse).  So the question was; to travel the 700km with the injury or to cry off and stay at home doing a  bunch of stuff that you need to get on with:  we were due to move house and I needed to finish my new book, so the temptation was pretty high to stay.

However, on the other hand I’d been climbing for 5 years with Jairo and never been on a trip with him…could I let him down at the last minute…??? Fuck!!

So I went. And we headed down towards Jaen – a short 700km or 9 hour drive – in Jairo’s motorhome. My arm was sore, strained and un-relentingly not good so I spent the time on the back watching movies being pissed off and massaging with my ‘Arm-Aid’ which seemed to help…

The team...Jairo, Juan and me...

The team…Jairo, Juan and me…

What made it doubly bad is that we were heading for Otinar and I’d been super-psyched for the trip. This is a ‘new’ venue which had a bit of a reputation, a mega steep cave with a bunch of 7s and 8s and nothing easier than 7a+ across the crag. With air cold, crisp and spring-like the 5 minute walk-in was get everyone breathing hard and there was a tangible excitement in the air. There were 6 of us and I’d decided to be cameraman for the day to rest an arm that seemed no better – a sore ‘pulley’ from the palm to the elbow.

EL COLETA 8a

The crag was very, very, very steep…Jairo on La Coleta, 8a,

On arrival the crag was decidedly well, brutal, not to put too fine a   point on it. It was really steep, even the warm ups were really steep and the hard routes were super steep. It made my arm twinge just looking.  However, the guys dived right in and set about mauling the warm/ups…then set about the main course.

Not the most aesthetic of venues set mainly above a huge goat pen the routes were very steep and it was inspiring as Miguel first then Jairo set about some of the most overhanging lines. My palms were sweating as Jairo gamely battled his way up, via a biiiiiig pump, a 7c which overhung 10m in it’s 23m length…I decided to make the most of the day and get some photos as I’d brought my ‘proper’ camera but after 4 shots the battery went – things weren’t going my way..

Day 3 started better and although my arm felt really sore I was determined to give it a go…then came a migraine so I went back to the van to lie down. Three days in and I hadn’t touched rock…after a sleep and a rest i felt a bit better and so wandered off and stretched in a ruined barn…the glamour!!

My 2nd 'rest' day...a bit of stretching...

My 2nd ‘rest’ day…a bit of stretching…

Day 4 – The dark side - After more ‘arm-aid’ i was ready to climb – and climb I did, like a big fat spanner. Warming up on the 6b+ part of very steep 7c (the easiest stretch of rock by far) I was nervous, static and slow. Feeling every day of my age I felt terrible, heavy and dulled – and somehow disappointed that the three weeks of training I’d done hadn’t turned me into a worldbeater. Then I pulled stupidly, forlornly onto the 7c, and ‘dogged’ the moves…it felt too hard, I felt too old and my frustration at my injury boiled over into cursing (not been known before) as I slumped on the rope. After I rest I then found myself falling off the next easiest route – a 7b which took an unlikely line – and a dark cloud descended!! Bad day at the office…

The bright side – However, I took solace watching an incredible French couple: him a 60 year old ‘lean, mean climbing machine’ and her a female version. They’d been there a few days and their modus operandi was clear and precise, he’d try and onsight and if he fell, work the route perfectly and send first RP. Then she’d go next following his instructions to normally execute a perfect ‘beta-flash’…now none of this would be of interest except that they both looked as old as the hills, they were doing this on routes up to 8a+ and they climbed so efficiently that it was a joy to watch. Very much a lesson in clever climbing and what you can do despite a few years…

55 year old French woman takes on silly steep 8a route and wins...

55 year old French woman takes on silly steep 8a route and wins…

Day 5 – Felt better. The clouds and cobwebs of day 4 had gone and I made a determined attempt to warm-up at the crag…And after some stretching a bit of use of Jairo’s mobile fingerboard and some rubber bands I got back on the warm-up – which, to my astonishment actually felt like a warm-up! Psyched I did it again and then climbed on into the 7c – carefully, testing all the holds for maximum efficiency and best body position – trying to channel Jerry Moffat’s matra ‘work it hard – send it easy’.

A redpoint ensued but cold hands put paid to anything and the rest afterwards only really made me more nervous. It was burly 7c and the likelyhood was I wouldn’t do it…however, as I launched into the crux sequence – a series of (for me) long snatchy moves off good holds – it just about clicked and despite a few, almost costly, moments of hesitation I slapped, stupidly pumped, onto the last jug. I’d got a send!! (something I’ll come back to in later Blogs).

I chilled for a bit and enjoyed watching Jairo send his 40 metre 8a with numb fingers and a lot of work, amazing effort.

The last night became more fun, I’d done summat so could relax a bit and as the G&T’s went down and the night grew longer the injury faded from my mind and the whole trip became better!

Ticks/Points of interest: 1 x 7c for 1500km of driving. And a typical ‘me’ route, bouldery and very cruxy and short…fun but nothing gained apart from the knowledge I hadn’t improved after 3 weeks. Watching the French couple showed that there’s life in old dogs and that clever outweighs strong!!

Lessons learned: Mates are more important than climbing and if you go you will get something done…and even if you don’t, go for a run, take photos, belay your friends and enjoy seeing somewhere new…oh and make sure your battery is charged…and use your mates for motivation and if you are injured don’t bring them down by moaning…

Score – 1 x 7c…Weight – 72.5kg

Did you know your mates laugh at you if you warm up at the crag...

Did you know your mates laugh at you if you warm up at the crag…



Caldueño – new crag in the east of Asturias…

There are loads of great new crags which have been published for the first time in any guide in the new edition of Roca Verde.

Caldueño is one and I am happy to be able to do so as I climbed there quite a bit before there were any topos. So thanks to the equippers Dani Bajo and Jorge Fernández there’s a great new crag close to Arenas and Llanes.  There’s a summary here but you can get it all  in the new book bit.ly/BuyRocaVerde2

Dani Pego Bajo, The Late Show, 6b+, Sector Dos Setas

Dani Pego Bajo, The Late Show, 6b+, Sector Dos Setas

Recently overhauled, though opened a long time ago, Caldueño is a good all-round venue with perhaps the highlight being a bunch of long slab routes. One attraction here is that there’s shade across the day so you can move between sectors to make the most of the conditions. Aviados and Pared del Sol are very accessible though the approach is steep, while the sectors set higher in a big gully are a bit of a hike.

Richie Patterson, De clavijas a chapas, 6b, Pared de Sol

Richie Patterson, De clavijas a chapas, 6b, Pared de Sol

However, there are enough decent routes to make the extra ten minutes worth it. The rock is generally very good but it’s worth noting that on Dos Setas it feels a bit suspect in places. Overall the bolting and belays are very good too with the odd exception. The crag needs traffic but once clean offers good climbing.
The situation is superb and the tranquility of the valley makes it a great place to spend a day – it’s well worth a visit.

Children: Although a bit of a steep walk both Aviados + Pared del Sol are ok but the rest are steep underneath.

Unos de los sectores de Caldueño, Dos Setas.

Unos de los sectores de Caldueño, Dos Setas.

Season: Due to the variety of orientations this is a good summer venue, and because it’s also quite sheltered it can be good on sunny days in spring and autumn. The slabs stay pretty dry and are ok on sunny winter days too. However, Ombligo and Dos Setas do get wet.
Bird Restrictions – climbing is banned on all routes from 1st March until 31st July.

La guia nueva de Roca Verde...the new Roca Verde guide...

La guia nueva de Roca Verde…the new Roca Verde guide…

 

Escalada en Caldueño – nueva escuela de escalada en el oriente de Asturias

Caldueño es una de las escuelas que no habían sido publicadas hasta ahora en ninguna guía. Y porque he escalado alli muchas veces antes que habia croquis estoy tan feliz de estrenarlo en Roca Verde edición 2…gracias a los equipadores Daniel Bajo y Jorge Fernández. Comprar Roca Verde edición 2 aquí..

Dani Pego Bajo, The Late Show, 6b+, Sector Dos Setas

Dani Pego Bajo, The Late Show, 6b+, Sector Dos Setas

Caldueño es una escuela considerablemente buena y muy versátil. Situada bastante cerca de Arenas, un poco más al oeste y hacia el norte (muy interesantes para los escaladores con base en Llanes o las costas), y hay cinco excelentes sectores reseñados  todas ellas con vías de grado variado.
Una cosa muy importante hay prohibiciones por nidificación en todas las vías – 1 marzo hasta 31 julio.

Jorge Fernandez, El Tendal, Sector Pared de Sol

Jorge Fernandez, El Tendal, Sector Pared de Sol

Aunque no es nueva, recientemente ha sido rescatada del olvido. Tal vez lo más destacado sean las excelentes y largas vías de placa. También es interesante por su orientación, que permite escoger entre sol y sombra según el sector.

Richie Patterson, De clavijas a chapas, 6b, Pared de Sol

Richie Patterson, De clavijas a chapas, 6b, Pared de Sol

La aproximación al Aviados y Pared del Sol es bastante sencilla pero empinada; para llegar a los sectores situados arriba en la ancha canal hay que caminar 10/15 minutos más, pero vale la pena por la cantidad de vías buenas. La roca es en general excelente, aunque en Dos Setas a veces no lo parece. Los seguros y reuniones están en buenas condiciones, con alguna excepción.

Aunque harán falta más ascensiones para que las vías queden limpias, la escalada está muy bien, y además cabe sumar la fantástica ubicación de la zona y la tranquilidad de este valle, que bien vale una visita. No hemos incluido todos los sectores ni todas las vías.

Puedes ver la location de la escuela aqui…

Unos de los sectores de Caldueño, Dos Setas.

Unos de los sectores de Caldueño, Dos Setas.

Niños: Aunque el camino es un poco empinado, Aviado y Pared del Sol están bien, pero en los demás el pie de vía hace bajada.

Época: Debido a las distintas orientaciones de los sectores, se puede ir en verano, pero también en días soleados de primavera y otoño, ya que está bastante resguardado. Las placas suelen estar secas y se puede escalar también en invierno al sol; en cambio, Ombligo y Dos Setas sí que se mojan. Aviso: Prohibiciones por nidificación en todas las vás – 1 marzo hasta 31 julio.

La guia nueva de Roca Verde...the new Roca Verde guide...

La guia nueva de Roca Verde…the new Roca Verde guide…

Descargar la mapa nueva de las regiones ‘Roca Verde’…

Mejorado, más facile leer y entender,  la nueva mapa de Roca Verde tiene todos los sitios que aparecen en la guía nueva.

Hay 6 nuevas escuelas que no habían sido publicadas hasta ahora en ninguna guía, un par que se nos olvidaron en la primera edición, así como muchos sectores nuevos añadidos a las escuelas existentes. En total, más de 500 vías nuevas.

New Asturias Map

Y recuerdas que puedes comprar el libro ahora aquí…

Comprar Roca Verde edición 2…