Tag Archives: Picos de Europa

La Hermida guide in stores across northern Spain…

After a hectic week of deliveries – then re-deliveries after the books sold out – our new guidebook is available in a ton of shops and bars across the region. And as the first batch sold out so quickly so we’ve done a second visit and loaded the stores with copies.

A quick list of the stores with books in the La Hermida region is:
Santander – Eiger Sport
Torrelavega – K2 Aventura
La Hermida – La Cuadrona /  Andaras
Potes – Tienda Indiana / Bar La Reunion / Libreria Vela / Bustamante de Potes
Arenas de Cabrales – La Tienda Nueva / Cendon
Cangas de Onis – Tuñon – Libreria Imagen

Then further west – around Oviedo and the Valles de Trubia:
Gijón – Indoor Wall
Aviles – Gravity Climbing
Oviedo – D-Ruta / Oxigeno
Valles de Trubia – Bar Sobia, Entrago / Bar Aladino, San Martin / Club de Montana Aguja de Sobia, Entrago.

Or you can buy the book direct from our pages…

http://bit.ly/BuyLaHermida

La guiá contiene un montón de fotos nuevas muy chulas de la escalada del valle...The guidebook cover features two of the most prominent climbers of the area...

La guiá contiene un montón de fotos nuevas muy chulas de la escalada del valle…The guidebook cover features two of the most prominent climbers of the area…

 

 

Vistas impresionantes, con Carcalosa detras... Alex López,
Ritmo caribeño,
F: José Alberto Puente Great view of the angle of the crag: and you can see Carcalosa behind

Cicera – Crags of La Hermida #1

A world-class venue, and possibly the crag that everyone´s been waiting for more than any other, Cicera has a selection of brilliant climbs on perfect rock. Sitting opposite, and complementing almost perfectly the ludicrous tufas of Carcalosa, the main sector is only slightly overhanging making for technical and very pumpy wall climbing.

Carlos Cué, Plataforma, 7c, Cicera, una vía muy técnica de placa desplomada.

Carlos Cué, Plataforma, 7c, Cicera, una vía muy técnica de placa desplomada.

It’s a mix of grey and orange rock with good friction and mainly long or very long routes. For those climbing in the high 7s and 8s there’s an endless supply of testpieces and, unlike much of the valley, it’s a venue where finger strength and climbing ability take precedence over big arms!

Vistas impresionantes, con Carcalosa detras... Alex López, Ritmo caribeño, F: José Alberto Puente Great view of the angle of the crag: and you can see Carcalosa behind

Vistas impresionantes, con Carcalosa detras… Alex López,
Ritmo caribeño, F: José Alberto Puente Great view of the angle of the crag: and you can see Carcalosa behind

In addition, the lower crag provides more entertainment in it’s own style with grey almost ‘Verdon-like’ fingery slabs and some tough, shorter roofs.

Carlos Cué, Mar Negro, 7b+, Sector Abajo, Cicera. Placa técnica de fuerza de dedos...One of the brilliant wall climbs on the lower crag...

Carlos Cué, Mar Negro, 7b+, Sector Abajo, Cicera. Placa técnica de fuerza de dedos…One of the brilliant wall climbs on the lower crag…

The familiar theme is the lack of easier climbs but with such high-quality routes it’s easy to forgive.

Routes Summary
V+ – 6c+ = 4
7a – 7c+ = 28
8a – 8c+ = 23

Another view of the lower crag, this time a super cool 7a, Corbatas de Unquera.

Another view of the lower crag, this time a super cool 7a, Corbatas de Unquera.

Children: Fine for older children but quite a long walk in and steep underneath.

Season: Usefully, the upper crag is almost never in the sun so it’s great through the summer and can also get a good breeze in late afternoon. The lack of sun does mean it can be cold in late autumn and spring and once wet it does seep a bit and can take a while to dry – though there are plenty of routes which stay dry all year. Overall it’s a very reliable venue for good conditions.

The upper crag has so many great wall climbs, this time it's Orujo de Liébana, 7c

The upper crag has so many great wall climbs, this time it’s Orujo de Liébana, 7c

 

Desde el inerior de la cueva...Alberto Hontavilla explorando el muro. The view from the inside. F. Reini Wallmann

Carcalosa – Resumenes de las escuelas de La Hermida #2

Un lugar de primera categoría, con un sorprendente surtido de líneas increíbles en una enorme cueva y sus muros colindantes.

Crossing the river...Como llegar, el rio!!

Crossing the river…Como llegar, el rio!!

La pared de la derecha es más asequible, con algunos sextos, mientras que la de la izquierda es impresionante por su desplome y la selección de vías muy duras; en ambos casos, la mayoría discurren sobre chorreras y son bastante largas. El acceso es muy empinado, pero vale la pena para quienes quieran disfrutar escalando vías excepcionales a partir del séptimo grado.

Caroline Ciavaldini en los ultimos pasos de Geyperman, 7c+. The last part of the 35m Geyperman on the right wall...

Caroline Ciavaldini en los ultimos pasos de Geyperman, 7c+. The last part of the 35m Geyperman on the right wall…

La roca en el interior de la cueva es blanca, con poca adherencia, pero la pared de la derecha es calcáreo gris y naranja, muy adherente. Puede decirse que ofrece la más impresionante concentración de chorreras del valle, con muchas posibilidades de apertura todavía.

Desde el inerior de la cueva...Alberto Hontavilla explorando el muro. The view from the inside. F. Reini Wallmann

Desde el inerior de la cueva…Alberto Hontavilla explorando el muro. The view from the inside. F. Reini Wallmann

En invierno el río puede ir demasiado crecido para cruzarlo, lo cual impide el acceso. Bien equipado con parabolts y reuniones.

Resumen de las vias:
V+ – 6c+ = 4
7a – 7c+ = 18
8a – 8c+ = 18

Niños: El acceso no es muy adecuado para niños, con muchas cuerdas fijas sobre roca muy empinada.

La vista desde Cicera...The view of the cave from Cicera...

La vista desde Cicera…The view of the cave from Cicera…

Época: Por su orientación sureste se puede escalar todo el año, con sombra a partir de las 14:00 en la pared de la derecha y mucho antes en la cueva. El problema es que las chorreras filtran en invierno y primavera.

Es mejor desde finales de primavera a principios de invierno. En verano puede correr un poco de aire por la tarde. En invierno y en primavera, si llueve mucho, el río a menudo va demasiado crecido para cruzarlo; ante la duda, mejor no intentarlo.

La portada del libro con Alberto Hontavilla en su proyecto de Urdón. F. José Alberto Puente

New La Hermida guide book!

Our new La Hermida climbing guide is at the printers!!!

The most anticipated guidebook of the year ‘El Desfiladero de La Hermida – the definitive sport climbing guide’ which contains 24 never before published crags (and nearly 700 routes) in this tufa-strewn region of northern Spain will be in shops in two weeks. 

However, you can be the first to get your hands on the book by pre-ordering it here on our website. And as soon as the book arrives in our warehouse we’ll ship it straight to you…the cost of the book is £20 and is available with free shipping to the UK for a limited period. 

Buy from the UK

Comprar desde España

Buy from Europe

La portada del libro con tiene Alberto Hontavilla en su proyecto de Urdón. F. José Alberto Puente

The front cover with Alberto Hontavilla on his project at Urdón. Ph. José Alberto Puente

 

To find out more about La Hermida and get a flavour of what’s on offer check out this destination guide on UKC

Niall Grimes reviews Roca Verde climbing…

My memories of Asturias are strong: long, sandy surf beaches populated by locals; rolling green hills not ten miles from the coast; wide open, quiet countryside with a ruralness reminiscent of quieter parts of Provence; drinking strong cider in cider-bars in quiet country towns. And being on the wrong route on a fabulous sport crag.

Asturias is the coastal province on the northern coast of Spain. Think ‘left of France’. It’s a big holiday destination for French and Spaniards, although little known outside these two countries. While this may be true from a tourism point of view, it’s an undisputable fact when it comes to climbing. Well perhaps this is about to change.

Roca Verde is a new guidebook from British ex-pat Richie Patterson. Richie has been living and climbing in the region now for eight years and has dedicated the past few to bringing information on the local crags together into one volume. As is often the way in Spain, some of these crags were covered in small, area specific guides, and some never recorded before. The result is a book which throws a whole new climbing destination onto the table for rock-hungry Spainophiles to get their teeth in to.

It looks amazing. The action shots reveal the blockbusting quality limestone that we have come to demand of Spain – steep walls, overhangs, tufas, orange-and-blue streaks – these are all in evidence here. The routes look cool and well featured and the photos – mostly Richie’s own – make me want to be there. I must point out one thing here: the author has allowed himself the indulgence of putting an okay shot of himself on the front cover, something that hasn’t happened since Andy Pollitt’s day. But we’ll overlook that for now.

+Gema Lanza climbing in the amazing Desfiladero de la Hermida, 222 kb
Gema Lanza climbing in the amazing Desfiladero de la Hermida
UKC Gear, 15 Jul 2014
© Richie Patterson

One thing that turns me on about the photos is the background. There’s more green around than we have come to expect from Spanish climbing settings. Trees and grass attest to the area’s higher rainfall when compared to the Costa Blanca, but all that dust down on the east side does my head in after a while. I’ll take the odd shower, especially since there are plenty of crags in this book that are weatherproof.

There’s a huge amount of rock in these pages. As well as Asturias it covers the neighbouring regions of Cantabria and León combining to nearly 3,000 routes from 2s and 3s right up to tediously-hard 9as. It seems best, in general, in spring and autumn, although lots of the crags I looked at were goers in summer and winter too.

The book itself seems to work very well. It is functional, fact and number heavy, as is the way with continental sport guides. Maps aren’t beautiful, but who cares. Out of curiosity I picked a few at random and compared them to Google Earth and they all seemed spot on. Scales would be handy, all the same. Topos are excellent, taken in great light, and serve to showcase crags really well.

One last point I had to broach with the author, was what relationship Richie had with locals. To my relief it turned out to be a constructive one. Locals were a big help and in the production and have received the guide well, perhaps helped by the fact that Richie actually lives there. This impression is helped by the fact that, going by the names at least, the people in the action photos are locals. In addition to this, Richie has pledged some of the profits from the book towards local bolt funds. I imagine that goes a long way to making locals happy.

Niall Grimes (or Grimer) is a fixture on the UK Climbing scene, publishes climbing books for a living and is welcome to visit any time!!

Bovedas in Teverga features 6b slabs and 7b+ tufas!!

Bovedas in Teverga features 6b slabs and 7b+ tufas!!

Roca Verde

Roca Verde is the first international guidebook, published in English and Spanish, to the amazing sports climbing in and around the Cordillera Cantábrica (inc. the Picos de Europa) in north west Spain. Roca Verde includes the best crags of the Spanish regions of Asturias, Cantabria and León.

Our intention is to highlight this fantastic area, which we believe has the potential to be a new ‘hotspot’ destination and a regular stopover for European climbers. The Roca Verde region is well served by international flights and ferries, has an excellent road network and, unlike much of Spain, has a climate that is amenable to climbing through the summer months.