Más chapas donadas desde el fondo…

Esta tarde fui al Refugio Del Llano, Quirós, para dar material para ayudarles a empezar otra ronda del re-equipamiento de la escuela.

Materiales por Quirós

Materiales por Quirós

La escuela  es una de las mas populares en Asturias pero todavia unas vías faltan chapas buenas y van a empezar pronto a re-equipar. Espero que en las semanas que viene yo puedo trabajar con ellos.

Puedes ver mas sobre el refugio aqui blog.refugioquiros.com o en su FB https://www.facebook.com/pages/Refugio-Del-LLano-Quiros/286642861530839?fref=ts

Puedes ver mas sobre el fondo aqui

Bolt Fund – El Condado re-equipping

Roca Verde is proud that we have established a bolt fund and I have started to get in contact with those hardy souls who are doing new routes or re-equipping.

This week I got in contact with David Acido who has taken on the task of cleaning up and re-equipping El Condado.  Close to Pola de Laviana this was an important proving ground in the late 90’s but due to the road being moved it has made it a less accessible and almost forgotten spot.

David has taken on the task of cleaning and re-equipping and so with money from the Roca Verde bolt fund I provided him with a load of stainless steel bolts and some belays too. I said I’d also help him Hopefully we will also produce new topos for the area and re-vitalise this once popular spot.

You can see more on his Facebook group

David with the material provided by the Roca Verde bolt fund.

David with the material provided by the Roca Verde bolt fund.

There’s plenty more bolts available and I am in the midst of contacting people to hand over materials

More bolts bought with the Roca Verde bolt fund...

More bolts bought with the Roca Verde bolt fund…

You can see more about who and where Bolt Fund bolts have gone on our bolt fund page Bolt Fund

Asturias has it’s first 9a…and it’s totally natural!

A few days ago I went to see for myself the first 9a in Asturias. It’s in Teverga, the ever expanding climbing paradise, but on an out of the way buttress which sports a selection of super routes.

Established over 15 days by Madrid climber, Pablo it’s a 28 metre gently overhanging wall which very unusually goes without resort to chipping or sica!! A fantastic effort!!

Jairo on the first hard section of Clandestino

Jairo on the first hard section of Clandestino

Arriving at the crag it was pretty obvious this wasn’t an evening for sending: the ‘Indian summer’ was continuing and it was around 25 degrees and very still. Jairo and Ignacio Mulero (a very strong youth who was projecting the route) were already there and it was incredibly inspirational to see Isaac ‘warming up’ by smoothly climbing through long sections of the route despite the sweaty humid conditions.

Ignacio Mulero on the 9a

Ignacio Mulero on the 9a

Unfortunately for me the crag’s easiest route is a 7c+/8a, called Alien and so after warming up as much as I could with a theraband I gamely gave it a go!!

Me warming up

Me warming up

Way steeper than it looked, I got thoroughly spanked first go and lowered off from what I thought was the crux as a sweaty mess. Second go I felt better and arrived at the ‘crux’ and after a few dogs got through it…however, as ever a bit of misunderstanding doesn’t help and I realised with horror that what I had done was a preliminary bit and the crux was yet to come.

Steep enough? Alien, 8a...

Steep enough? Alien, 8a…

 

Rio Seco – Steep and savage…

After a gap of about two years I returned to Rio Seco for a session with Arturo and Adri. And although conditions were against us (it was still about 25 degrees when I arrived) I was still surprised by how fierce the routes were. Never a spot for beginners I was still taken a bit aback by the steepness, especially in the central part of Diamante where I’d never climbed.

Adrian Gonzalez on La de Sergio 7a/+

Adrian Gonzalez on La de Sergio 7a/+

Sector Diamante is perhaps the hardest of the sectors at Rio Seco and takes no prisoners – especially in the heat. I started on a route I’d done a few times as a warm up Nozalina, 7a, and promptly rested three times and came down running with sweat…it was worse than I’d thought!!

Fortunately Adri had left the clips in the next one, the ‘much steeper than it looked’ La de Sergio, 7a/+. This took a very steep but mercifully short tufa line up to a chain which allowed you to warm up without the obviously brutal move that the extension of the route took at an undergraded 7c+…

On the finish of  La de Sergio 7a/+

On the finish of La de Sergio 7a/+

Adri and Arturo then introduced me the next level on the very bouldery, Viciosilla, 8a. One very hard move leads to a difficult slab and between them, the moves, with tiny crimps, proved impossible in the heat.

Arturo on Viciosilla, 8a, Sector Diamante

Arturo on Viciosilla, 8a, Sector Diamante

Importantly I also met up with I also met up with David Acido who has taken on the task of cleaning up and re-equipping the almost forgotten crag of El Condado. Close to Pola de Laviana this was an important proving ground in the late 90’s but due to the road being moved it has made it a less accessible and almost forgotten spot.

David has taken on the task of cleaning and re-equipping and so with money from the Roca Verde bolt fund I provided him with a load of stainless steel bolts and some belays too. I said I’d also help him Hopefully we will also produce new topos for the area and re-vitalise this one popular spot.

David with the material provided by the Roca Verde bolt fund.

David with the material provided by the Roca Verde bolt fund.

 

 

Roca Verde guidebook review by Miles Gibson for Climber Magazine

This month sees the publication of another review of the Roca Verde guidebook, this time in Climber magazine.

Reviewed by Miles Gibson I am very happy to say that he thinks it’s a good guide and heartily recommends the area.
You can read it below:

Roca Verde review by Miles Gibson publshed by Climber Magazine Nov 2014

Roca Verde review by Miles Gibson publshed by Climber Magazine Nov 2014